Graduate Coach Blog

The 7 high-impact traits employers look for – part 2

Posted: October 14, 2015 at 1:48 pm | Author: Chris Davies

In our last blog entry we discussed the first three high impact traits that make an employer want to snap you up. These traits are highly sought by employers because they make a real difference to an organisation.

If you have them you will stand out, so let’s look at the remaining four to help you understand what employers really look for and how you can ensure you are that person.

 

EMPATHY

Wherever you work, being able to be an effective member of a team is essential. Teams are made up of individuals with their own particular strengths and skills but it’s the bringing together of these diverse abilities that makes teamwork collaborative, exciting and creative. These days teams can be multi-national if not global in nature, but effective teamwork still comes down to some basic skills. These are just a few of them:

  • social awareness
  • self-awareness
  • empathy or emotional intelligence
  • openness
  • expression
  • diplomacy

To be an effective team member, your future employer will want to know if you can recognise emotions in others. Are you empathetic? He or she may ask you a list of questions to ascertain your level of self-awareness, or you may be required to put yourself in the shoes of a family member or close friend. How would they see you? Can you describe your own strengths and weaknesses honestly?

Try to recall a time when your experience of teamwork was testing to say the least. Perhaps this was due to difficult personalities or being set a pressurised task. What role did you play in the team? How did you resolve the difficulties? Also, what do you enjoy about teamwork? Your employer will want to understand how you as a personality will fit into a team and how responsive you will be to that team.

POSITIVITY

Employers know that successful candidates are the ones who get on with the task in hand come what may. They don’t complain or dwell on their problems; they have a positive outlook and they take the initiative. Let’s face it; there will always be problems to solve and difficulties to face in the workplace, but the candidate who doesn’t blame others, or try to find fault in others, is the one who will remain focused and on target. There’s no point in feeling sorry for yourself if things aren’t going your way; you need to be able turn things around and take control. You can only do this if you’re committed to your task, your team and your organisation and if you’re brimming with positivity.

Your employer may try to discover if you see yourself as a victim of circumstances by asking questions like “Have you ever felt neglected by your teammates?” or “Have you ever experienced an injustice at work or university?” He or she will want to find out if you’re someone who feels sorry for yourself or if you’re someone who can learn from situations and move on with a positive outlook.

INQUISITIVENESS

What excites you? What do you enjoy learning about? Are you a curious person who simply loves the process of acquiring knowledge? In fact, are you a veritable encyclopaedia of information? Your interviewer will love this trait in you because being inquisitive leads to many other desirable traits such as imagination, creativity and innovation.

So if you can show your potential employer that you not only enjoy learning new things but can learn them in detail, this will be seen as another desirable characteristic. Perhaps you had to research which speakers to buy for your sound system and discovered many interesting facts about them along the way? Perhaps your hobby is collecting musical instruments and you have a wealth of knowledge on the subject? Whatever your fascination is, make sure you impart your knowledge and your enthusiasm to your potential employer. And don’t forget that the interview will nearly always end with “Now, before you leave, do you have any more questions?” Remember, if you’re an inquisitive person, you certainly will have more questions!

CONFIDENCE

Even though you may be feeling nervous in your job interview, try to ensure that your language is clear and concise. Don’t allow yourself to waffle anxiously; make sure your words are to the point. Remember, it’s not just what you say; it’s how you express yourself that counts. Above all, you want to engage your interviewer.

Try to appear confident in both your spoken language and your body language. Sit upright because you can be sure that your posture will be noted. Also, make sure you’re fully involved in the interview and that your attention isn’t wandering. If you can come across as being energetic, alert and in control, then you’ll be remembered.

Of course, you’ll need to appear confident and courteous in all of your dealings with the organisation – not just in your CV, letter of application and interview. If you need to contact the organisation by email, ensure your email is well written, relevant and clear. If you need to phone the organisation, be polite and responsive. If someone has given up their time to meet you, why not send them a thank-you note? Your attention to detail and your thoughtfulness will make a lasting impression.

 

In our last blog entry we discussed the first three high impact traits that make an employer want to snap you up. These traits are highly sought by employers because they make a real difference to an organisation.

If you have them you will stand out, so let’s look at the remaining four to help you understand what employers really look for and how you can ensure you are that person.

 

EMPATHY

Wherever you work, being able to be an effective member of a team is essential. Teams are made up of individuals with their own particular strengths and skills but it’s the bringing together of these diverse abilities that makes teamwork collaborative, exciting and creative. These days teams can be multi-national if not global in nature, but effective teamwork still comes down to some basic skills. These are just a few of them:

  • social awareness
  • self-awareness
  • empathy or emotional intelligence
  • openness
  • expression
  • diplomacy

To be an effective team member, your future employer will want to know if you can recognise emotions in others. Are you empathetic? He or she may ask you a list of questions to ascertain your level of self-awareness, or you may be required to put yourself in the shoes of a family member or close friend. How would they see you? Can you describe your own strengths and weaknesses honestly?

Try to recall a time when your experience of teamwork was testing to say the least. Perhaps this was due to difficult personalities or being set a pressurised task. What role did you play in the team? How did you resolve the difficulties? Also, what do you enjoy about teamwork? Your employer will want to understand how you as a personality will fit into a team and how responsive you will be to that team.

POSITIVITY

Employers know that successful candidates are the ones who get on with the task in hand come what may. They don’t complain or dwell on their problems; they have a positive outlook and they take the initiative. Let’s face it; there will always be problems to solve and difficulties to face in the workplace, but the candidate who doesn’t blame others, or try to find fault in others, is the one who will remain focused and on target. There’s no point in feeling sorry for yourself if things aren’t going your way; you need to be able turn things around and take control. You can only do this if you’re committed to your task, your team and your organisation and if you’re brimming with positivity.

Your employer may try to discover if you see yourself as a victim of circumstances by asking questions like “Have you ever felt neglected by your teammates?” or “Have you ever experienced an injustice at work or university?” He or she will want to find out if you’re someone who feels sorry for yourself or if you’re someone who can learn from situations and move on with a positive outlook.

INQUISITIVENESS

What excites you? What do you enjoy learning about? Are you a curious person who simply loves the process of acquiring knowledge? In fact, are you a veritable encyclopaedia of information? Your interviewer will love this trait in you because being inquisitive leads to many other desirable traits such as imagination, creativity and innovation.

So if you can show your potential employer that you not only enjoy learning new things but can learn them in detail, this will be seen as another desirable characteristic. Perhaps you had to research which speakers to buy for your sound system and discovered many interesting facts about them along the way? Perhaps your hobby is collecting musical instruments and you have a wealth of knowledge on the subject? Whatever your fascination is, make sure you impart your knowledge and your enthusiasm to your potential employer. And don’t forget that the interview will nearly always end with “Now, before you leave, do you have any more questions?” Remember, if you’re an inquisitive person, you certainly will have more questions!

CONFIDENCE

Even though you may be feeling nervous in your job interview, try to ensure that your language is clear and concise. Don’t allow yourself to waffle anxiously; make sure your words are to the point. Remember, it’s not just what you say; it’s how you express yourself that counts. Above all, you want to engage your interviewer.

Try to appear confident in both your spoken language and your body language. Sit upright because you can be sure that your posture will be noted. Also, make sure you’re fully involved in the interview and that your attention isn’t wandering. If you can come across as being energetic, alert and in control, then you’ll be remembered.

Of course, you’ll need to appear confident and courteous in all of your dealings with the organisation – not just in your CV, letter of application and interview. If you need to contact the organisation by email, ensure your email is well written, relevant and clear. If you need to phone the organisation, be polite and responsive. If someone has given up their time to meet you, why not send them a thank-you note? Your attention to detail and your thoughtfulness will make a lasting impression.

 

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